Persuasive essay thesis statement writing tips

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Your thesis for your persuasive essay should spell out what you want to communicate. It should state what you are going to prove so that the reader knows what to expect. The thesis sets the stage, which is why it is part of the introduction. It essentially shows what you intend to prove, so you should make sure your introduction puts it in the correct context. For example, in an example later on there is the use of the word “lord” in a thesis statement. The introduction puts it in context so the reader knows if it means “lord” in a religious way or a title-owning way.

Speak in certainties within your thesis and it will put people off

If you want more people to read it, then try not to speak in certain terms. For example, when a Jehovah witness comes to your door and says, “god is the answer to all questions” (also, that is a very flawed statement even in religious terms), then it is far less appealing than a person saying, “You know, a lot of my success I can attribute to god.”

You may have a very strong persuasive thesis and may have a very strong essay, but write in certain terms during your thesis and some people will not read. They may prejudge your essay as heavy handed or may even judge the writer as a fanatic. Have a gentler approach. Here are a few examples to drive the point home:

Heavy handed:
In this essay, I prove that greenhouse gasses cause global warming.

Gentle:
In this essay, I present evidence that strongly suggests greenhouse gasses cause global warming.

Heavy handed:
This essay shows how I found the one true lord.

Gentle:
This essay shows how my experiences proved to me that there is a god.

Heavy handed:
In this essay, I show that watching TV must cause people to be dumber

Gentle:
In this essay, I show how watching TV may cause some people to become dumber

Do you want to give away the ending so soon?

You may already know how you are going to end/conclude your essay, but you do not have to give away the ending in the introduction. You can leave a question as to what the conclusion will be so that you may lead the reader into your way of thinking as you gradually go through the essay. This type of tactic has to be handled delicately because your professor may confuse “leaving a question” as poor thesis writing. He or she may even regard the essay as an argumentative one over being a persuasive one.

Research your essay before writing your thesis statement

In other words, you should research what your essay is going to be about and figure out how much evidence you have in your favor before you render a decision on your thesis statement. If you jump to a conclusion, then what are you going to do when you find lots of research that contradicts your thesis statement later on?

Remember when you write your essay that you need to make a point and end a point. There are some people that will make a point and spend 500 words making it when they could have spend 100 words making it. A point may have more impact if you are concise and do not dance around the issue.

Plan your essay before you write your thesis statement

How can you plan before you decide the thesis? What you do is come up with a temporary thesis idea. Once you have planned your essay you can see how well your thesis is going to hold up against the evidence and counter arguments. You then refine your thesis so that it fits with the essay plan.

On a similar note, when you have finished your essay, you should go back to your thesis statement and see if it still fits with your essay. Your essay may have shifted focus a little as you were writing, or it may have become a little more weighted in one direction than you expected. Your conclusion may have even changed in a way that makes your thesis a little less relevant. These are the reasons you should go back to your thesis when you have finished your essay and amend it.

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