Persuasive Historical Speeches

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History is littered with persuasive speeches, and even though many of them may have been sterilized and fixed so that history remembers them a little bit better, the most recent ones that were caught on film show the actual speech for all to see. Here are some of the most famous persuasive speeches in history.

Theodore Roosevelt

This speech is called, “The Man with the Muckrake” and it was have a persuasive speech that called for a change in society, in the economy and in the government. What he was actually calling for was for the journalists of the day to cover the reforms that he was making, instead of the usual trashy stories that they were running.

Winston Churchill

Winston Churchill was known for number of things, one of them being that he ran Britain during the Second World War, and was part of the reason why Britain turned out to be one of the only countries to survive and repel the attacks from the German Nazi party. If it were not for Britain holding out and resisting the Germans, then the Americans would have had a great deal of trouble joining the war after the Japanese surprise attacked Pearl Harbor. The American and British alliance allowed large American planes to land and refuel in Britain before flying over to Germany to bomb it. Winston Churchill was the one who gave a fantastic speech in front of a large crowd, and in which he stated that boldly that Britain would never give up. Part of his speech said, “We shall fight them in the skies, and we shall fight them on the beaches”.

John F. Kennedy

John F. Kennedy made two very persuasive points within his inauguration speech. His first one was about how nobody should have their freedom restricted. He went on to say how Americans should be allowed a freedom, but also that no other country or people should be left out of the bigger picture. Another thing that he said was that the American citizens should not ask what their country can do for them, but what they can do for their country.

Alexander the Great

After discovering that his men had lost the will to fight the Persian Empire, Alexander the Great created a speech that pointed out that their lands are their home and their own, and that when they fight they are fighting for their own land.

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