Some lesser known facts behind famous persuasive speeches

Share this post...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

There are many famous persuasive speeches and the most memorable ones had been remembered for very different reasons. Yet have you noticed that is always certain sound bites that are remembered instead of the entire speech.? The funny thing is that many times the speech is misquoted, and the misquote becomes the more popular version. For example, Margaret Thatcher never said “release the dogs of war”, Michael Caine never said, “not a lot of people know that” (at least not in the movie).

Marie Antoinette’s never said, “let them eat cake”, and Clint Eastwood who played Dirty Harry never actually said “Are you feeling lucky punk?” (the correct version is far more long winded). Darth Vader didn’t actually say “Luke I am your father”. What he actually said was, “No, I am your father”. The Star Wars one was probably said because the original quote seems odd when taken out of context.

John F. Kennedy repeated himself

During the inaugural speech by John F. Kennedy in 1961, he actually said his most famous line in different ways during the same speech. The most famous line was “ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country”. That is the line that is often remembered when referring to John’s famous speech, however did you know that he also said the less popular (and less quoted) “My fellow citizens of the world: ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man.”

Ronald Reagan was asleep on the job

Ronald Reagan once made a funny remark saying that “I have orders to be awakened at a time in the case of a national emergency, even if I’m in a cabinet meeting.” This is a very nice piece of wordplay, because he is saying that he is basically asleep on the job but ready for an oncoming emergency.

Robert F. Kennedy could see the future

Robert F. Kennedy did once utter a very poignant phrase which is still true today in a world where terrorism is now the newest form of guerrilla warfare. In 1964 Robert F. Kennedy said “What is objectionable, what is dangerous about extremists is not that they are extreme, but that they are intolerant.” In a time when that fact has never been more apparent, he was stating this in the 1960s, long before extremists from the Middle East made global terrorism truly global.

Rate this post

Share this post...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Pin on PinterestShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

+ 68 = 71